Aimee Furr_poetry sound devices

Consonance
repetition of consonant sounds within words or a sentence

Consonance (example from Nothing Gold Can Stay)
“Then leaf subsides to leaf./So Eden sank to grief (5/6).” The usage of the “f” sound in “leaf” and “grief” creates not only a rhyme, but gives the poem a kind of meter.

Consonance (example from The Silken Tent)
“She is as in a field a silken tent (1).” The usage of the “s” sound in “she,” “is,” “as,” and “silken” altogether create a euphonic flow to the line.

Alliteration
repetition of consonant sounds at the start of words

Alliteration (example from Nothing Gold Can Stay)
“Her hardest hue to hold (2).” The “h” sound is repeated at the beginning of every word save “to,” creating a flow in the words.

Alliteration (example from The Silken Tent)
“Has dried the dew and all its ropes relent (3).” The repeated “d” sound in “dried” and “dew,” as well as the repetition of the “r” sound in “ropes” and “relent” help to connect the actions with the noun, allowing for easier comprehension of the poem.

Cacophony
a mix of harsh and inharmonious words

Cacophony (example from Nothing Gold Can Stay)
“So Eden sank to grief (6).” The usage of the “ie” sound in “grief” creates an image of the harshness of the “grief.”

Cacophony (example from The Silken Tent)
“But strictly held by none… (9).” The “i” sound in “strictly” lets the reader almost feel how the tent is in the wind.

Assonance
repetition of vowel sounds

Assonance (example from Nothing Gold Can Stay)
“Nothing gold can stay (8).” The “o” being repeated in “nothing” and “gold” and the “a” being repeated in “can” and “stay” solidifies the overall theme of the poem, stating that nothing good lasts forever.

Assonance (example from The Silken Tent)
“…sunny summer… (2).” The usage of “u” helps the poem to flow better, as well as connect a setting to the subject of the poem.

Euphony
words with a lovely and harmonious tone.

Euphony (example from Nothing Gold Can Stay)
“But only so an hour (4).” The drawn out vowels help to create a placid harmony within the line.

Euphony (example from The Silken Tent)
“…sunny summer breeze (2).” The usage of the long “u” and long “e” sounds help create placidity within the poem.