Essay #4 Research Note Cards

1

Bremer, Sidney H. “Home in Harlem, New York: Lessons from the Harlem Renaissance Writers.” PMLA, Vol. 105, No. 1 (Jan., 1990): 47-56. JSTOR. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.
Note Type: S
Web (JSTOR)

1

This quote summarizes how the writers of the Harlem Renaissance were active in their day. They were important to not only the movement, but the advancement of writing.

In Text: “The writers of the Harlem Renaissance were an extremely mobile crew, who felt joined, not estranged, by their wanderings, because they were part of the migration of black people to the urban Northeast around World War I”(Bremer 48).

2

Davis, Arthur P. “The Harlem of Langston Hughes’ Poetry.” Phylon (1940-1956), Vol. 13, No. 4 (4th Qtr., 1952): 276-283. JSTOR. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.
Note Type: S
Web (JSTOR)

2

This quote also summarizes the importance of African Americans of the Harlem Renaissance to showcase their work. Davis criticizes the writers for not making their work public at first. It was written by Langston Hughes.

In-Text: “I live in the heart of Harlem…The people of Harlem seem not very different from others, except in language. I love the color of their language: and, being a Harlemite myself, their problems and interests are my problems and interests”

3

Dunn, Allen, and George Hutchinson. “THE FUTURE OF THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE.” Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal, Vol. 80, No. 4 (Winter 1997): 445-454. JSTOR. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.
Note Type: C (S & A)
Web (JSTOR)

3

This quote comes from the Langston Hughes poem The Big Sea. It analyzes the living in Harlem and summarizes their journey.

Block Quote: “I was there. I had a swell time while it lasted. But I thought it wouldn’t last long…. For how could a large and enthusiastic number of people be crazy about Negroes forever? But some Harlemites thought the millennium had come. They thought the race problem had at last been solved through Art plus Gladys Bentley. They were sure the New Negro would leas a new life from on in green pastures of tolerance created by Countee Cullen, Ethel Waters, Claude McKay, Duke Ellington, Bojangles, and Alain Locke”(Dunn and Hutchinson 445).

4

Hughes, Langston. American Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Ed. Linda Ellis, et al. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2000. 841. Print.
Book (Prentice Hall Literature)
Note Type: S

4

Summary from the PHL book.

The Negro Speaks of Rivers
By Langston Hughes

I’ve known rivers:
I’ve known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins.

My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young.
I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to sleep.
I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it.
I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln went down to New Orleans, and I’ve seen its muddy bosom turn all golden in the sunset.

I’ve known rivers:
Ancient, dusky rivers.

My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

5

Hughes, Langston. “Harlem.” Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.
Note Type: S
Web. Accessible URL: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/175884

5

Online Poem. Poetry Foundation. Outlines the life of African Americans during the time of the Harlem Renaissance.

Harlem
By Langston Hughes

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore—
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over—
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?

6

McKay, Claude. “Claude McKay.” Poets.org. Academy of Poets, 1997-2014. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.
Note Type: Q
Web. Accessible URL: http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/25

6

Quote from Claude McKay, Poets.org.

“If a man is not faithful to his own individuality, he cannot be loyal to anything”(poets.org: Claude McKay).

7

Hughes, Langston. “The Negro Speaks of Rivers.” Poetry Foundation. Poetry Foundation, n.d. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.
Note Type: S
Web. Accessible URL: http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/173693

7

Online Poem. Also found in PHL book. Outlines the life of African Americans during the time of the Harlem Renaissance, most notably the personal and mental struggles to life a peaceful life.

The Negro Speaks of Rivers
By Langston Hughes

I’ve known rivers:
I’ve known rivers ancient as the world and older than the flow of human blood in human veins.

My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young.
I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to sleep.
I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it.
I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln went down to New Orleans, and I’ve seen its muddy bosom turn all golden in the sunset.

I’ve known rivers:
Ancient, dusky rivers.

My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

8

English, Kaylanne K. “Selecting the Harlem Renaissance.” Critical Inquiry, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Summer, 1999): 807-821. JSTOR. Web. 15 Apr. 2014.
Note Type: C (S & A)
Web (JSTOR)

8

JSTOR article. This article suggests why the Harlem Renaissance was such an inspirational cultural movement in the lives of all Americans, regardless of race.

Combo of Analyzing and Summarizing. “It is difficult not to recognize the signs that African Americans are in the midst of a cultural renaissance”(English 807).

9

Hughes, Langston. American Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Ed. Linda Ellis, et al. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2000. 838. Print.
Book (Prentice Hall Literature)
Note Type: C= S & A

9
Langston Hughes Bio. PHL Book.

10

McKay, Claude. American Literature: Timeless Voices, Timeless Themes. Ed. Linda Ellis, et al. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2000. 838. Print.
Book (Prentice Hall Literature)
Note Type: C= S & A

10

Claude McKay Bio. PHL Book.