In Golding’s novel Lord of the Flies, we

In Golding’s novel Lord of the Flies, we examine how the protagonist changes as a result of his experiences. Ralph’s leadership changes throughout being on the island. He is the primary representation of order, civilization and solidity. Ralph grows in maturity and recognizes the steps that need to be taken to return back to civilization. Ralph learns the aspect of sacrifice while he is on the island. He understands that to maintain civilization, sacrifice needs to occur. In Golding’s novel Lord of the flies, the protagonist Ralph changes throughout his experience on the island by leadership, growth in maturity and sacrifice. Ralph’s leadership changes throughout being on the island. In the beginning, Ralph does not know anything about being a leader and questions his abilities. In the end, we see his true leadership skills are revealed. Ralph brings out his leadership skills by assigning tasks to people by laying down the rules, so the boys can reconnect to civilization. As the boys are preparing to make a fire Ralph says, “Fire on the mountain. If we have a signal going, they’ll come and take us off. And another thing. We ought to have more rules. Where the conch is, that’s a meeting (Golding, 42). This demonstrates Ralph’s ability to lead by establishing rules in an effort to maintain the island and return to civilization. As a natural born leader, Ralph assumes the responsibility for authority. In anger, Ralph spurs out “The storm broke. Sit down! Shut up! Take the conch! Sod you! Shut up!” (96). This demonstrates how Ralph takes control of tough situations, acts responsible and tries to create a society. After Ralph is elected to be chief, he uses his voice to announce that they must keep the fire going to be one step closer towards rescue. Ralph announces, “I’m chief. Because you chose me. And we were going to keep the fire going. Now you run after food–” (229-231). Ralph displays his ability to vocalize and give authorized orders. Ralph’s leadership skills have evolved and played a big part of the boys’ lives on the island. Ralph grows in maturity and recognizes the steps that need to be taken to return back to civilization. Ralph is listening to what Jack is saying about hunting animals and is requesting for                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        the hunters to search for meat. Ralph demands to say, “We need hunters to get us meat. And another thing” (33). Ralph shows that he is maturing a little by thinking ahead and thinking about the group that is starving. Ralph defends Piggy to Jack and his hunters at Castle Rock. Ralph exclaims, “First you’ve got to give back Piggy’s specs. If he hasn’t got them he can’t see” (177). Ralph stands up for Piggy when Jack took his glasses and demands him to return the glasses to Piggy. Ralph uses his voice to help Piggy, This shows maturity in Ralph’s character by doing the right thing and his loyalty to Piggy. When things are not going as planned and the boys are not taking the assigned tasks seriously, Ralph becomes frustrated. Ralph exclaims, “Don’t you understand you painted fools? Sam, Erics, Piggy and me- we aren’t enough. We tried to keep the fire going, but we couldn’t. And then, you, playing at hunting” (178). This shows maturity from Ralph because he speaks up about the island and how everyone should become more engaged in the tasks for survival. Ralph understands that in order to maintain the hope of rescue amongst the boys, he must lead as an example by acting mature. Ralph learns the aspect of sacrifice while he is on the island. He understands that to maintain civilization, sacrifice needs to occur. Ralph is talking about Piggy and keeping him safe. Ralph says, “I’ll go first, then Piggy a pace behind me” (174). Ralph sacrifices himself to keep Piggy safe as well, being a leader. Ralph is talking to the savages about how they need to keep the fire going. Ralph states, “Your only hope is keeping a signal fire going as long as there is light to see” (197). Ralph sacrifices himself not having a fire so the boys can have a fire going. After witnessing Piggy’s death, Ralph “wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart, and the fall through the air of the true” (202). Ralph knew the sacrifice they had to take to survive on the island, though he has lost his innocence. Ralph distinguished the sacrifice that was needed to take place on the island to survive. He tried to make things right by avoiding the sacrifices that he needed to take, though it happened. Therefore it is evident that Ralph’s leadership changes throughout being on the island. His character is the primary representation of order, civilization and solidity. Ralph grows in maturity and recognizes the steps that need to be taken to return back to civilization. Ralph learns the aspect of sacrifice while on the island. He understands that to maintain civilization, sacrifice needs to occur. Ralph changes throughout his experience on the island by leadership, growth in maturity and sacrifice.