India because a few people wish to preserve

 India is a nation characterised by a myriad of languages.According to the official 2001 Census, India contains 122 major languages and1,599 other languages. As many as 60 major languages are spoken by more than 1lakh people, and 30 of these are spoken by more than 10 lakh people.

Thelinguistic diversity in India is so stark that the country itself does not havean official language, with the most widely spoken language being only spoken byjust over 50% of the population. In 1968, the government introduced thethree-language formula wherein in public education, a student has to learn 3languages: Hindi, English, and the regional language. There has been a recent,vehement plea by a BJP politician to make Marathi compulsory in all schools inMaharashtra up to the 8th grade. The request highlights a problemthat children all over India are facing today, subjection to a language that willnever help them in life and to a language they will struggle to learn justbecause a few people wish to preserve it.

Using a vernacular language as amedium of education in India today is an orthodox and irrational proposition.The major reason for this is that although India is dividedinto states, these 29 states fail to represent the country’s linguisticdiversity. Within each state, there are multiple dialects and individuals fromdifferent parts of the state cannot communicate with one another although theytechnically speak the same language. Within Maharashtra itself there are 42identifiable dialects of Marathi! Educators do not take this into considerationwhen they put forward the “mother tongue” argument. This means that a childends up studying in a language they don’t speak, as opposed to being taughtEnglish at the primary level, and then utilizing it during Middle school andhigh school. In cities like Mumbai where immigration is rampant, thenumber of Marathi speakers is a lot lower than intuitivelty guessed.  Only 68.

8% of the population of Maharashtraspeaks Marathi natively. This means that a staggering 35 million people inMaharashtra do not speak Marathi, and yet, children will be forced to learn itcompulsorily.   DemocraticIndia, the India of the 21st century, has struggled with accusationsof an unspoken underlying caste system that exists within its structure.However false these accusations may be, the fact of the matter is that inIndia, citizens that can speak English fluently are perceived as moreintelligent that their counterparts who speak another language fluently, suchas Hindi or a local language.

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This is the mindset of the average Indian, andthe mindset of potential employers. Forcing a Marathi-based education on childrensystematically ensures lower-wage jobs for them in the future. English isincreasingly becoming the language of access across an increasingly globalizedworld. The truth is that the companies consider the candidate’s inability or abilityto converse fluently in English as a major selection criterion. Softskills are a vital criterion for employees.

English is also a commondenominator for a large portion of India; knowing English improves acandidate’s chances of being transferred across the country as knowing aregional language only makes a candidate useful in a particular area. While themother tongue can continue to be the medium of instruction, the study of Hindiis desirable to bring all Indians together as citizens of a single nation. Thestudy of English is equally of importance to enable her to transcendgeographical boundaries and function effectively at the national andinternational level.MostEnglish medium schools in India are privately funded, thereby increasing theirtuition fee, excluding poorer people from attending these schools. However, ifthe government makes an effort to put in place public English Medium Schools,then even poorer people can learn English from a young age and improve theirjob opportunities. Englishis also the language of access around the world, with English being one of theofficial languages at the UN and is spoken by an estimated 2 billion people.

 India is a nation characterised by a myriad of languages.According to the official 2001 Census, India contains 122 major languages and1,599 other languages. As many as 60 major languages are spoken by more than 1lakh people, and 30 of these are spoken by more than 10 lakh people. Thelinguistic diversity in India is so stark that the country itself does not havean official language, with the most widely spoken language being only spoken byjust over 50% of the population.

In 1968, the government introduced thethree-language formula wherein in public education, a student has to learn 3languages: Hindi, English, and the regional language. There has been a recent,vehement plea by a BJP politician to make Marathi compulsory in all schools inMaharashtra up to the 8th grade. The request highlights a problemthat children all over India are facing today, subjection to a language that willnever help them in life and to a language they will struggle to learn justbecause a few people wish to preserve it.

Using a vernacular language as amedium of education in India today is an orthodox and irrational proposition.The major reason for this is that although India is dividedinto states, these 29 states fail to represent the country’s linguisticdiversity. Within each state, there are multiple dialects and individuals fromdifferent parts of the state cannot communicate with one another although theytechnically speak the same language. Within Maharashtra itself there are 42identifiable dialects of Marathi! Educators do not take this into considerationwhen they put forward the “mother tongue” argument. This means that a childends up studying in a language they don’t speak, as opposed to being taughtEnglish at the primary level, and then utilizing it during Middle school andhigh school. In cities like Mumbai where immigration is rampant, thenumber of Marathi speakers is a lot lower than intuitivelty guessed.  Only 68.8% of the population of Maharashtraspeaks Marathi natively.

This means that a staggering 35 million people inMaharashtra do not speak Marathi, and yet, children will be forced to learn itcompulsorily.   DemocraticIndia, the India of the 21st century, has struggled with accusationsof an unspoken underlying caste system that exists within its structure.However false these accusations may be, the fact of the matter is that inIndia, citizens that can speak English fluently are perceived as moreintelligent that their counterparts who speak another language fluently, suchas Hindi or a local language. This is the mindset of the average Indian, andthe mindset of potential employers. Forcing a Marathi-based education on childrensystematically ensures lower-wage jobs for them in the future. English isincreasingly becoming the language of access across an increasingly globalizedworld.

The truth is that the companies consider the candidate’s inability or abilityto converse fluently in English as a major selection criterion. Softskills are a vital criterion for employees. English is also a commondenominator for a large portion of India; knowing English improves acandidate’s chances of being transferred across the country as knowing aregional language only makes a candidate useful in a particular area.

While themother tongue can continue to be the medium of instruction, the study of Hindiis desirable to bring all Indians together as citizens of a single nation. Thestudy of English is equally of importance to enable her to transcendgeographical boundaries and function effectively at the national andinternational level.MostEnglish medium schools in India are privately funded, thereby increasing theirtuition fee, excluding poorer people from attending these schools. However, ifthe government makes an effort to put in place public English Medium Schools,then even poorer people can learn English from a young age and improve theirjob opportunities.

Englishis also the language of access around the world, with English being one of theofficial languages at the UN and is spoken by an estimated 2 billion people.