Laurence internment of Japanese-Americans (“Japanese American Internment”). o

Laurence Lai                                                                                                                        12/19/17

English 8IA PD: 4                                                                                                     
Mr. Mechanic

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Japanese-American Internment – Social
Conflict During War

I.             Introduction

–         
Hook: Unfairly treated, and cruelly forced
to relocate to inhumane internment camps, these were the horrible conditions
that Japanese-Americans faced during World War II.

–         
Thesis Statement: The brutal internment of
Japanese-Americans during World War II resulted in a remarkable influx of Civil
Rights movement, which eventually led up to the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 and
other important laws. This compromise has helped ensure that the inhumane
treatment of American citizens never occurs again in controversial events such
as 9/11, and has helped create a solid Asian/Pacific-American presence in
America.

II.        Body (What was the Japanese-American
Internment?)

–         
Who was involved?

o  
The internment of 120,000 American
citizens of Japanese descent (“Reparations for Wartime Internment of Japanese
Americans”).

o   President Franklin Delano Roosevelt authorized the
evacuation of Japanese Americans (“Reparations for Wartime Japanese Americans”).

–         
What were some important events/dates/years?

o  
President Franklin Roosevelt signed
Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942, which allowed for the internment of
Japanese-Americans (“Japanese American Internment”).

o  
The attack on Pearl Harbor in December 7, 1941
and World War II caused Americans to fear the possibility of Japanese-Americans
being double agents (“Japanese American Internment”).

o  
On June 1942, Japanese-Americans on the
West Coast were moved to temporary detention camps named “Assembly Centers’,
but were soon relocated to internment camps on November, 1942. (“Internment of
Japanese Americans during World War II”).

III.       Body (How did the Japanese-American
Internment end in a compromise?)

–         
Who was involved?

o  
Fred Korematsu argued that the internment
of Japanese-Americans was unconstitutional in the 1944 case of Korematsu v. United States (“Reparations
for Wartime Internment of Japanese Americans”).

o  
The Japanese American Citizens League
(JACL) was a national civil rights organization which pushed for redress and
restitution for Japanese-Americans who were under the United States internment
policies (“The Legacy of Japanese-American Internment”).

–         
What were some important events/dates/years?

o  
In December 1944, the Supreme Court ruled
in Ex parte Endo that loyal citizens could not be detained against their will
any longer (“Internment of Japanese Americans during World War II”).

o  
The McCarren-Walter Act of 1952 allowed
Japanese immigration, removed alien land laws, and let Japanese Americans
become American citizens again (“The Legacy of Japanese-American Internment”).

o  
The Civil Liberties Act of 1988 provided
an official apology from the U.S. government to all internees, restitution for
former internees, and added internment to public education (“The Legacy of
Japanese-American Internment”).

IV.       Body (What happened because of the
Japanese-American Internment compromise?)

–         
Japanese-Americans were one of the most
prominent groups to issue reminders about preserving constitutional and civil
rights for Islamic people during 9/11 (“The Legacy of Japanese-American
Internment”).

–         
Civil rights activists say that one of
their top priorities is to make sure that civilian internment never again takes
place in the Unites States (“The Legacy of the Japanese American Internment”).

–         
The effort to pass the act (Civil
Liberties of 1988) helped consolidate a national Asian/Pacific-American
lobbying group and presence in Washington D.C. (“Reparations for Wartime
Internment of Japanese Americans”).

V.
       Conclusion

–         
The inhumane internment of Japanese-Americans
during World War II ended in the rise of many Civil Rights movements, and with
many laws like the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 made to protect American
citizens from cruel internment. The legacy of this compromise still lasts
today, with many Japanese-American citizens and civil rights activists pushing
against cruel internment in controversial events like 9/11, and with the strong
and growing Asian/Pacific-American presence in modern America.

 

 

 

Laurence Lai                                                                                                                        12/19/17

English 8IA PD: 4                                                                                                     
Mr. Mechanic

Japanese-American Internment – Social
Conflict During War

Unfairly
treated, and cruelly forced to relocate to inhumane internment camps, these
were the horrible conditions that Japanese-Americans faced during World War II.
Discrimination in the 1940s was already a problem, but the ruthless internment of
Japanese-Americans just made it worse. This brutal internment of
Japanese-Americans during World War II resulted in a remarkable influx of Civil
Rights movement, which eventually led up to the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 and
other important laws. Nowadays, the compromise has helped ensure that the
inhumane treatment of American citizens never occurs again in controversial
events such as 9/11, and has helped create a solid Asian/Pacific-American
presence in America. Japanese-American internment might be over now, but its
huge influence on America still lives on today.

            The
Japanese-American internment was a hugely controversial conflict that showed
the malice and spitefulness of America. The article, “Reparations for Wartime
Internment of Japanese-Americans” states that the Japanese-American internment
involved the “internment of 120,000 American citizens of Japanese descent”
(“Reparations for Wartime Internment of Japanese-Americans”). This detail is
important, because the fact that America was only targeting Japanese-Americans
shows how discriminative and racist the beliefs of America were at that time.
The reason why Japanese-Americans were interned leads to President Franklin
Delano Roosevelt, who “authorized the
evacuation of Japanese Americans” (“Reparations for Wartime Internment of
Japanese-Americans”). More specifically, “On February 19, 1942, President Franklin
Roosevelt (1882-1945) signed Executive Order 9066”,
which authorized the internment of Japanese-Americans. What makes this scarier
is the fact that Executive Order 9066 was able to pass through every step of a
bill without any moral questions asked. After this harsh law went in effect, “By
June 1942, the Japanese Americans residing on the West Coast had been moved into
temporary detention camp (assembly centers)”, and then later on, “by November,
1942, the Japanese Americans were moved from the Assembly Centers to internment
camps” (“Internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II”). These pitiless
internment camps closely resemble the horrifying detention camps of the
Holocaust, in the way that they both held people with an opposing feature
against their will. However, Japanese-American internment camps did not go to
such extremes as the Holocaust’s brutal camps. The unjustified internment of
Japanese-Americans would not be solved until the December 1944 rule in Ex parte
Endo (“Internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II”)