Module 3 Poetry

Types of Rhyme
End Rhyme
Internal Rhyme
Eye Rhyme
Slant Rhyme
Identical Rhyme

End Rhyme
The sounds at the end of lines rhyme.

Internal Rhyme
The sounds within a line rhyme.

Eye Rhyme
The words look like they should rhyme, but when you say them aloud they don’t – like rough and through.

Slant Rhyme
The words share sounds but don’t quite rhyme- like above and blush.

Identical Rhyme
The same word is repeated.

Rhyme Scheme
A rhyme scheme is labeled with letters.

End-stopped lines
Lines of poetry that end with a punctuation mark, or naturally stop where the line still makes sense, encourage the reader to pause before moving on to the next idea.

Enjambed Lines
Lines of poetry that end in the middle of a thought and do not make sense without the line that come next.

Fixed verse
Poems that follow specific rules.

Free verse
Poems that break the rules

Narrative Categories
Ballad
Epic
Limerick

Ballad
A poem that tells a story, usually of a romanticized character, in short, rhythmic stanzas.

Epic
A long poem that tells a story of a hero or legend.

Limerick
A short, humorous poem that follows a specific structure.

Lyric Categories
Sonnet
Elegy
Ode

Sonnet
A love poem, generally that follows a specific structure.

Elegy
A somber poem written in mourning for the dead.

Ode
A serious poem written to express strong emotion.

Descriptive Poem
Realistically describes actual people, places, or things.

Narrative Poem
Tells a story.

Lyric Poem
Expresses deep feelings or emotions.

Types of Stanza
Two lines
Three lines
Four lines
Five Lines
Six Lines

Two lines
Couplet

Three lines
Tercet

Four lines
Quatrain

Five lines
Quintain

Six lines
Sestet

Mood
The way the author wants the reader to feel while reading.

Imagery
Descriptive language.

Rythym
The consistent aaaabcccb rhyme scheme helps the reader settle into a comfortable place.

Tone
Attitude toward an subject or situation.