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According to the OECD, France has the fifth largest economy in the world in 2016,
especially thanks to the service sector, which accounts for more than 70% of the French
national GDP. Being one of the global leaders in the aerospace, railway, automobile, cosmetics
and luxury goods industry, France also has a highly educated and skilled workforce compared
to the world average.
Talking about its peer countries, it must be said that France hasn’t been as negatively
affected by the crisis as most of its neighbors. Indeed, while France’s GDP only decreased in
2009 (from 1,995.5 billion euros in 2008 to 1,939 billion euros in 2009 – see appendix 1), the
country relied on a consistent private consumption. That being said, since 2010, the recovery
has been quite slow, which, combined with a growing unemployment, is a challenging task for
the different budget and monetary policymakers.
Concerning the international business, France’s best and closest trading ally remains
Germany, with which it sells machinery, plastics, and transportation equipment.
While France has recently faced difficult years, partly due to the previous governments’
low efficiency to manage the Subprime and post Subprime debt crisis, the economic authorities
such as the OECD or “La Banque de France” forecasted a sharp increase of the French
economic activity in 2017, as there was going to be the election of a new government. The
election of president Emmanuel Macron confirmed this forecast and as a result, the French
economic activity has positively accelerated in 2017, thanks to a strong private investment level
and a strong increase of the housing market.
As an example, the French has realized a 12th consecutive trimester of increased job
creation, with 44 500 new jobs in the 3rd quarter of 2017 (+ 0.2% vs Q2 2017) announced by
the INSEE on the 12th of December.
Even if this slight acceleration is a good thing for the country, it must be said that the
positive effects will be felt in the medium-long run. At the moment, high levels of private and
corporate investment have strongly boosted France’s recovery. Indeed, a fiscal incentive for
firms to invest, named the over-amortization scheme, has enabled a sustainable flow of goods
and money in 2017. Consequently, the corporate investment level in France has been forecasted
to grow by 2.5 points of percentage by 2018, and by 2.6 points of percentage by 2019.
That being said, the increase of the GDP through the last years has triggered a growing
inflation, which in return had a significant negative impact on private investments in France. As
a result, the overall investment level in France will “only” increase by 2 points of percentage in
2019 versus 2.1% in 2018, while the private investment is forecasted to grow by 0.4 points of
percentage in 2019 versus 1.2% in 2018, according to la Banque de France (appendix 2).
Therefore, even if the inflation level is very far from what countries like Argentina or
Venezuela are currently facing, France needs to ensure that the inflation does not prevent
domestic consumers from making private investments.
In addition, the fall of oil prices in 2016 had encouraged a strong national demand,
which is about to slowly decrease in the coming years. However, this forecasted decrease in
demand would be balanced by an increase in households’ consumption, by +1.5% as expected
5
in 2018 and 2019. Indeed, the
new French government
wishes to facilitate household’s
consumption and investment
levels by setting up “zero-rate
loans” and low-rate credits.
When it comes to the
commercial balance, it must be
said that some events have
negatively impacted the French
exports: decrease in tourism
mainly due to terrorist attacks,
bad farm crops, difficulties of
the Airbus production process. Therefore, exports are forecasted to rise by 5.1 points of
percentage in 2018 and 4.2 points of percentage in 2019. In addition, the sustained global
demand in 2017 is benefiting to the domestic economy, especially when it concerns dairy
products, for which the know-how of French producers is appreciated beyond our frontiers.
Also, the slight forecasted deceleration of French imports shows that the commercial balance
will continue to grow in the coming years.
However, this activity growth level in France still remains inferior to the average
Eurozone growth rate, which amplifies the risk of setting up our activity in France. Indeed, we
must consider the foreign competition, especially when it comes to industrial groups selling
butter in the domestic French market. This represents a great challenge for our group of
managers.

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The internet, a massive collection of computers linked by electronic signals and governed by a set of shared software protocols that allow packets of data to be passed from one computer to another. Now, you get that data via your internet service provider (ISP), which routes the data from servers to your computer or smartphone. You probably know these ISPs as telecom companies—AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, Sprint.

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ISPs currently are paid by you, the end user. You pay them to give you access to the entire internet they send you all the content you ask for at one set cost and speed, treating one data packet just the same as another. This is net neutrality, where all online content is treated equally.

The telecom companies, however, complain that some content, like streaming video, takes up more bandwidth or data than, say, sending a text message. They argue that the new high-bandwidth content costs them money and that content providers (such as YouTube or Netflix) should pay for how much bandwidth they use. Without c urrent Net Neutrality regulations, ISPs would be allowed to ask content providers to pay a toll to get on the internet highway, where there will be slow lanes and fast lanes depen ding on the amount a company pays.

Now, in 2015 the Federal Communication Commission (or the FCC) signed into law, under the Obama Administration, Net Neutrality guidelines known as the Open Internet Order which the FCC itself describes briefly as “an order which will enact strong, sustainable rules to protect the Open Internet and ensure that Americans reap the economic, social, and civic benefits of an Open Internet today and into the future” 

Which is exactly what citizens had been fighting towards for years. But the fight is not over, the new Trump designated FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, is attempting to, as he put it himself “attack the current Net Neutrality rules with a weed wacker”