Poetry Handouts Study Guide

stanza
a group of consecutive lines in a poem that form a single unit; a division of a poem that is often referred to as a “paragraph of poetry.”

couplet
2 line stanza

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now
triplet
three line stanza

quatrain
4 line stanza

quintet
5 line stanza

sestet
6 line stanza

septet
7 line stanza

octave
8 line stanza

Rhyme
the similarity or likeness of sound in two or more words

perfect rhyme
rhyme involving sounds that are exactly the same
i. example: groaned/moaned

imperfect rhyme
rhyme involving sounds that are similar, but not exactly the same.
i. example: sun/gone. pleasure/leisure.
-only this if it is among perfect rhymes

eye rhyme (slant rhyme)
rhyme that depends on spelling rather than sound.
i. example: daughter/laughter. cough/dough. gone/lone.

end rhyme
rhyme between words that occur at the ends of two or more lines.
i. Example: From my boyhood I remember / A crystal moment of September

internal rhyme
rhyme between words occurring within a single line of poetry
i. Example: O fleet sweet swallow

rhyme scheme
the pattern or sequence in which rhyme occurs. the first sound is represented or designated as a, the second sound is designated as b and so on. when the first sound is repeated, it is also designated as a. the designation of sounds is labeled continuously throughout the poem-even if the sound is repeated in a later stanza. every line marked a should rhyme.

rhythm
the pattern of stressed (/) and unstressed (u) syllables in poetry; may be regular or irregular. (as a whole)

meter
(rhythm)
the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in a line of poetry

foot
(rhythm)
a unit of meter. a metrical foot can have two or three syllables. poetic lines are classified according to the number of feet in a line.

scansion (rhythm)
marking lines of poetry to show the number and type of feet they contain.

iambic foot
(types of metrical feet)
(2 syllable feet)(rhythm)
a two syllable foot with the stress on the second syllable. it is the most common foot in English.
i. example: be (u) low (/), de (u) light (/), a (u) muse (/)

trochaic foot (types of metrical feet) (2 syllable feet)(rhythm)
a two syllable foot with the stress on the first syllable
i. example: ne (/) ver (u), gat (/) her (u), hap (/) py (u)

spondaic foot (types of metrical feet) (2 syllable feet)(rhythm)
a two syllable foot with the stress on both syllables
i. example: heart (/) break (/), child (/) hood (/), foot (/) ball (/)

pyrrhic foot (types of metrical feet) (2 syllable feet) (rhythm)
a two syllable foot with no stressed syllables
i. example: of (u) a (u), in (u) the (u)

anapestic foot (types of metrical feet) (3 syllable feet)(rhythm)
a three syllable foot with the stress on the last syllable
i. example: cav (u) a (u) lier (/), in (u) ter (u) twine (/)

dactylic foot (types of metrical feet) (3 syllable feet) (rhythm)
a three syllable foot with the stress on the first syllable
i. example: hap (/) pi (u) ness (u), mer (/) ri (u) ly (u), mur (/) mu (u) ring (u)

Greek word for finger

monometer (types of metrical lines) (rhythm)
one foot per line

dimeter (types of metrical lines) (rhythm)
two feet per line

trimeter (types of metrical lines)(rhythm)
three feet per line

tetrameter (types of metrical lines) (rhythm)
four feet per line

pentameter (types of metrical lines)(rhythm)
five feet per line

hexameter (types of metrical lines) (rhythm)
six feet per line

heptameter (types of metrical lines) (rhythm)
seven feet per line

octameter (types of metrical lines) (rhythm)
eight feet per line

rhymed verse (verse form) (rhythm)
consists of a verse with end rhyme and regular meter

blank verse (verse form) (rhythm)
consists of unrhymed iambic pentameter. Shakespeare

free verse (verse form) (rhythm)
consists of lines of poetry that do not have a regular rhythm and do not rhyme

run-on line/enjambment
(rhythm)
a line of verse which continues into the following line without a grammatical break
i. example: “I say no more than hath been said in Dante’s / Verse, and by Solomon and by Cerbantes” –Lord Byron

– read quickly
– no pause