Poetry: Meter & Rhyme (Pt 2)

Common Meter/Common Measure
4 lined stanza, with first and third in iambic tetrameter and the other two in iambic trimeter
Rhyme Scheme: abab OR abcb

Counterpoint Rhythm
Hopkins named it this, and it refers to the insertion of a different rhythm in a poem than the one already being used. This is pretty hard to spot when you read it silently, but when you read it aloud, it emerges more clearly.

Distributed Stress/Hovering Stress/Resolved Stress
This happens when two syllables “share” a stress in the meter

Foot
Unit of rhythm in poetry; it can be described as quantitative or accentual – syllabic; it can be of varying lengths (number of syllables)

Breve
The symbol indicating a short or unstressed syllable. It looks like a pasta elbow.

Macron
The symbol indicating a long or stressed syllable. it looks like an apostrophe.

Ictus
Stress on a syllable; not the syllable, or the symbol, but the actual stress.

2 Syllables
Iamb, trochee, spondee, & pyrrhic

Iamb
example: forego (u/a)

Trochee
example: weather (a/u)

Spondee
Example: football (a/a)

Pyrrich
in a poem, this foot is made with two short, unaccented words (u/u)

3 syllables
Amphibrach, Amphimacer, Anapest, Antibacchius, Baccius, Dactyl

Amphibrach
example: arrangement (u/a/u)

Amphimacer
example: nevermore (a/u/a)

Anapest
example: “like a child from the womb, like a ghost from the tomb” (4 anapestic feet in that line)

Antibacchius
example: high mountains (a/a/u)

Bacchius
example: Marie Claire (u/a/a/)

Dactyl
example: mannikin (a/u/u)

4 syllables
Choriambus & Paeon

Choriambus
example: year upon year (a/u/u/a)

Paeon
example: vegetable (a/u/u/u)