romantic poems/worksheets key lines

“Of the last bitter hour come like a blight over they spirit, and sad images of stern agony, and shroud, and pall, and breathless darkness , and the narrow house…”
last bitter hour= euphemism to hour before death
narrow house= metaphor to coffin
theme= melancholy, thanatopsis by bryant

“Go forth under the open sky, and list to nature’s teachings, while from all around earth and her waters…”
thanatopsis by bryant , this is saying nature can prepare us for death because it sees death daily

“Nor in the embrace of ocean shall exist thy image”
thanatopsis by bryant, saying once your death no one knows what you look like/ who you a re

“The oak shall send his abroad, and pierce thy mould”
thanatopsis by bryant , imagery

“all that tread the globe are but a handful to the tribes that slumber in its bosom.”
thanatopsis by bryant, more people alive than dead

“Shall one by one be gathered to thy side, by those, who in their turn shall follow them.”
thanatopsis by bryant , allusion to people in line for the underworld

“By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave, like one who wraps the drapery of his couch about him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.”
thanatopsis by bryant, simile saying we should look forward to death like its sleep

“What a world of merriment their melody foretells! How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle, in the icy air of night.”
the bells by poe, onomatopoeia

“Hear the sledges with the bells, silver bells.”
the bells by poe, connotation on silver= light weight & valuable which represents early stages of life

“Hear the mellow wedding bells, golden bells”
the bells by poe, connotation on gold= shiny, more valuable which represents the happiness of the married couple

“From the molten golden notes…”
the bells by poe, assonance

“To the turtle dove that listens…”
the bells by poe, turtle doves appear at weddings- symbol

“Hear the loud alarum bells, brazen bells.”
the bells by poe, connotation on bronze= heavier, less valuable which represents getting older

“In a clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire…”
the bells by poe, fire= symbolizes an alarm of getting older

“How they clang, clash, and roar.”
the bells by poe, onomatopoeia

“Hear the tolling of the bells, iron bells.”
the bells by poe, connotation on iron= heavy, black, not valuable which represents death/ old age

“Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary.”
the raven by poe, alliteration

“and the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain thrilled me– filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before”
the raven by poe, s sounds= represent what the curtains would sound like (onomatopoeia)

“doubting, dreaming, dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before.”
the raven by poe, alliteration

“perched upon a bust of Pallas just above by chamber door.”
the raven by poe, allusion to Athena

“quoth the raven nevermore”
the raven by poe, ambiguity the bird means no but poe thinks its his name

“What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt..”
the raven by poe, alliteration

“is there balm in gilead”
the raven by poe, allusion to biblical city (comfort)

“Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door”
the raven by poe, antithesis

“Ruler who neither see, nor feel, nor know, but leech- like to their fainting country cling.”
sonnet: england in 1819 by shelley, simile to say king sucks everything out of country

“till they drop, blind in blood, without a blow.”
sonnet: england in 1819 by shelley, alliteration

“Makes a two- edged sword to all who wield”
sonnet: england in 1819 by shelley, sword that hurts you and someone else

“Religion, christless, godless, a book sealed”
sonnet: england in 1819 by shelley, social criticism on the churches, and a paradox

“O wild west wind, thou breath of autumns being”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, apostrophe

“Are driven, like ghosts from an enchanter fleeing”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, simile which means the leaves are moving around

“yellow, and black, and pale, and hectic red.”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, person w/ tuberculosis

“wild spirit, which art moving everywhere; destroyer and preserver; hear, oh, hear.”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, apostrophe to the wind, and paradox (destroyer and preserver to the seeds)

“Shook from the tangled boughs of Heaven and Ocean.”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, allusion to zeus and poseidon

“Besides a pumice isle in Baiae’s bay, and saw in sleep old palaces and tower.”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, allusion to Atlantis

“If I were a dead leaf though mightiest bear; If I were a swift cloud…”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, anaphora

“I fall upon the thorns of life! I bleed!”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, sentimentality

“Drive my dead thoughts over the universe like withered leave to quicken a new birth!”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, simile asking wind to take thoughts = poetry

“If winter comes can spring be far behind”
Ode to the west wind by shelley, saying when things seem bad good is coming

“Then felt I some watcher of the skies”
on first looking unto Chapman’s Homer, epithet to astronomer

“One minute past, and Lethe- wards had sunk”
Ode to Nightingale by Keats, allusion to river of forgetfulness

“Tasting of Flora and the country green, dance and provencal song, and sunburnt mirth”
Ode to Nightingale by Keats, synesthesia

“O for a beaker full of the warm South”
Ode to Nightingale by Keats, metonymy

“The murmurous haunt of flies on summer eves”
Ode to Nightingale by Keats, onomatopoeia

“Thou wast not born for death, immortal bird”
Ode to Nightingale by Keats, paradox saying the species is forever

“Through the sad heart of Ruth, when sick for home”
Ode to Nightingale by Keats, allusion to biblical character Ruth

‘In Tempe of the dales of Arcady”
Ode on a Grecian Urn by Keats, mythological allusions

“Here melodies are sweet, but those unheard are sweeter”
Ode to Nightingale by Keats, paradox

“When old age shall this generation wastrel thou shalt remain”
Ode to Nightingale by Keats, saying when we die our art stays

“Before my pen has glean’d by teeming brain”
When I have fears that I may cease to be by Keats, saying he doesn’t want to die before all his thoughts are on paper

“Before high- piled books, in charactery, hold like rich garners the full ripen’d grain”
When I have fears that I may cease to be by Keats, simile

“Of the wide world I stand alone, and think Till love and fame to nothingness do sink”
When I have fears that I may cease to be by Keats, sentimentality

“Nothing besides remains”
Ozymandias by Shelley, dramatic irony- all thats left is the inscriptions