Unit 3 Test: The Beauty of Poetry

Which of the following is an example of alliteration in this stanza?
Since then ’tis centuries; but each
Feels shorter than the day
I first surmised the horses’ heads
Were toward eternity.
C. horses, heads

What type of imagery is missing in this passage of poetry?
We are the hollow men
We are the stuffed men
Leaning together
Headpiece filled with straw. Alas!
Our dried voices, when
We whisper together
Are quiet and meaningless
As wind in dry grass
Or rats’ feet over broken glass
In our dry cellar
***NOT SURE*** the wrong answer is D. Touch

In what way can a poet use form to give meaning to a poem?
D. Stanzas can divide the poem into different ideas.

Which stanza in this poem shows the most enjambment?
Because I could not stop for Death
by Emily Dickinson
Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.

We slowly drove, he knew no haste,
And I had put away
My labor, and my leisure too,
For his civility.

We passed the school where children played,
Their lessons scarcely done;
We passed the fields of gazing grain,
We passed the setting sun.

We paused before a house that seemed
A swelling of the ground;
The roof was scarcely visible,
The cornice but a mound.

Since then ’tis centuries; but each
Feels shorter than the day
I first surmised the horses’ heads
Were toward eternity.

D. Stanza 5

How many stanzas does the poem, “O Captain my Captain!” contain?

O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring.
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up – for you the flag is flung – for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’s wreaths – for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

A. 3

Which of the following lines from the poem, “O Captain my Captain!” contains an example of imagery?

O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring.
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up – for you the flag is flung – for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’s wreaths – for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

***NOT SURE***

What kind of figurative language is used in these lines of poetry?

“Fame is a bee. / It has a song — / It has a sting –“

A. metaphor

What type of figurative language compares two unlike things using words such as “like” or “as”?
C. simile

What type of figurative language gives human qualities to a nonhuman thing?
B. personification

When does a “line break” occur in a poem?
B. When a poet ends one line and begins another one

In Stanza 2, line 5 of the poem “O Captain my Captain!” the line “Here Captain! dear father!” is an example of what kind of figurative language?

O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring.
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up – for you the flag is flung – for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’s wreaths – for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

***NOT SURE*** the wrong answer is C. Personification

What kind of figurative language is NOT in this line of poetry?

“His eyes were hollows of madness, his hair like mouldy hay”

***NOT SURE*** the wrong answer is A. metaphor

Which of the following is the best definition of the term “form” as it is used in poetry?
D. The structure of the poem and how it looks on the page

What type of figurative language compares two unlike things without using words such as “like” or “as”?
A. metaphor

What is the term for the grouping of lines within a poem?
D. Stanzas

What type of imagery is used most often in stanza one of this poem?
A Fantasy
By Sara Teasdale
Her voice is like clear water
That drips upon a stone
In forests far and silent
Where Quiet plays alone.

Her thoughts are like the lotus
Abloom by sacred streams
Beneath the temple arches
Where Quiet sits and dreams.

Her kisses are the roses
That glow while dusk is deep
In Persian garden closes
Where Quiet falls asleep

C. Sound

What kind of figurative language is used in these lines of poetry?

“When the stars threw down their spears, / And water’d heaven with their tears”

B. personification

What are the two components of form in poetry?
B. Line and stanza

Which of the following describes the form of the poem “The Mirror” by Sylvia Plath?
D. Two stanzas, nine lines each

In the poem, “O Captain my Captain!” how many lines are contained in each stanza?

O CAPTAIN! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won;
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring.
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up – for you the flag is flung – for you the bugle trills;
For you bouquets and ribbon’s wreaths – for you the shores a-crowding;
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head;
It is some dream that on the deck,
You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still;
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will;
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done;
From fearful trip, the victor ship, comes in with object won;
Exult, O shores, and ring, O bells!
But I, with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

C. 8

Which sense is primarily involved in the following imagery? “i will kiss your cool bark / and hug you safe and tight / just as your mother would,”
D. Touch

What kind of stanza is used in this poem?
Because I could not stop for Death
by Emily Dickinson
Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.

We slowly drove, he knew no haste,
And I had put away
My labor, and my leisure too,
For his civility.

We passed the school where children played,
Their lessons scarcely done;
We passed the fields of gazing grain,
We passed the setting sun.

We paused before a house that seemed
A swelling of the ground;
The roof was scarcely visible,
The cornice but a mound.

Since then ’tis centuries; but each
Feels shorter than the day
I first surmised the horses’ heads
Were toward eternity.

B. Quatrain

Which lines in the following stanza rhyme?
Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.
***NOT SURE*** the wrong answer is A. All of the lines rhyme.

Which stanza in this poem shows the most end-stopped lines?
Because I could not stop for Death
by Emily Dickinson
Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
The carriage held but just ourselves
And Immortality.

We slowly drove, he knew no haste,
And I had put away
My labor, and my leisure too,
For his civility.

We passed the school where children played,
Their lessons scarcely done;
We passed the fields of gazing grain,
We passed the setting sun.

We paused before a house that seemed
A swelling of the ground;
The roof was scarcely visible,
The cornice but a mound.

Since then ’tis centuries; but each
Feels shorter than the day
I first surmised the horses’ heads
Were toward eternity.

C. Stanza 3

Which of the following is an example of assonance in this stanza?
We slowly drove, he knew no haste,
And I had put away
My labor, and my leisure too,
For his civility.
A. Line slowly, drove

Which of the following best shows the pattern of rhythm in these two lines?
Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;
A. Because I could not stop for Death,
He kindly stopped for me;

Which of the following words conveys a helpless tone?
A. Begging

In the poem “The Mirror” by Sylvia Plath, who is the speaker?
B. Mirror

What would be the best way to mark the rhyme scheme in this stanza?
We paused before a house that seemed
A swelling of the ground;
The roof was scarcely visible,
The cornice but a mound.
C. A, B, C, B

What is one characteristic that theme should posses?
A. Theme should be universal and understood by all.