Victorian Poetry Quotes

“I was not free from apprehension”
Charles Dickens

“And every spirit upon the earth
Seemed fervourless as I.”
Thomas Hardy

“An aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small,
In blast-beruffled plume,
Had chosen thus to fling his soul
Upon the growing gloom.”
Thomas Hardy

“So little cause for carolings
Of such ecstatic sound
Was written on terrestrial things”
Thomas Hardy

“That I could think there trembled through
His happy good-night air
Some blessed Hope,”
Thomas Hardy

“And Winter’s dregs made desolate
The weakening eye of day.”
Thomas Hardy

“And all mankind that haunted nigh
Had sought their household fires.”
Thomas Hardy

“When Frost was spectre-gray,”
Thomas Hardy

“The tangled bine-stems scored the sky
Like strings of broken lyres,”
Thomas Hardy

“The land’s sharp features seemed to be
The Century’s corpse outleant,
His crypt the cloudy canopy,
The wind his death-lament.”
Thomas Hardy

“The ancient pulse of germ and birth
Was shrunken hard and dry,”
Thomas Hardy

“Some blessed Hope, whereof he knew
And I was unaware.”
Thomas Hardy

“The sea is calm tonight.”
Matthew Arnold

“Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land,”
Matthew Arnold

“Listen! you hear the grating roar
Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling, “
Matthew Arnold

“Sophocles long ago
Heard it on the Ægean, and it brought”
Matthew Arnold

“Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear”
Matthew Arnold

“Listen! you hear the grating roar”
Matthew Arnold

“With tremulous cadence slow, and bring
The eternal note of sadness in.”
Matthew Arnold

“Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,”
Matthew Arnold

“Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.”
Matthew Arnold

“Hath really neither joy, nor love, nor light,”
Matthew Arnold

“Into his mind the turbid ebb and flow
Of human misery; we”
Matthew Arnold

“Nor certitude, nor peace, nor help for pain;”
Matthew Arnold

“Swept with confused alarms of struggle and flight,
Where ignorant armies clash by night.”
Matthew Arnold

“The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth’s shore”
Matthew Arnold

“Of human misery; we
Find also in the sound a thought,
Hearing it by this distant northern sea.”
Matthew Arnold

“To one another! for the world, which seems
To lie before us like a land of dreams,”
Matthew Arnold

“And we are here as on a darkling plain”
Matthew Arnold

“Glory be to God”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“For skies of couple-colour as a brinded cow”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?)”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change:”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“Praise Him.”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim;
Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches’ wings;”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“Landscape plotted and pieced–fold, fallow, and plough;”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“And all trades, their gear and tackle and trim.”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“Glory be to God for dappled things”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“All things counter, original, spare, strange;”
Gerard Manly Hopkins

“since none puts by
The curtain I have drawn for you, but I)”
Robert Browning

“She thanked men, – good! but thanked
Somehow – I know not how – as if she ranked
My gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name
With anybody’s gift.”
Robert Browning

“- E’en then would be some stooping; and I choose
Never to stoop.”
Robert Browning

“This grew; I gave commands;
Then all smiles stopped together.”
Robert Browning

“Nay, we’ll go
Together down, sir.”
Robert Browning

“never read
Strangers like you that pictured countenance,
The depth and passion of its earnest glance,
But to myself they turned . . .
And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst,
How such a glance came there”
Robert Browning

“Even had you skill
In speech – (which I have not) – to make your will
Quite clear to such an one”
Robert Browning

“I call
That piece a wonder, now: Frà Pandolf’s hands
Worked busily a day, and there she stands.”
Robert Browning

“that pictured countenance,
The depth and passion of its earnest glance”
Robert Browning

“Paint
Must never hope to reproduce the faint
Half-flush that dies along her throat:”
Robert Browning

“Too easily impressed: she liked whate’er
She looked on, and her looks went everywhere.”
Robert Browning

“There she stands
As if alive.”
Robert Browning

“Notice Neptune, though,
Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity,
Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!”
Robert Browning

“as if she ranked
My gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name
With anybody’s gift. Who’d stoop to blame
This sort of trifling?”
Robert Browning

“Just this
Or that in you disgusts me; here you miss,
Or there exceed the mark”
Robert Browning

“Sir, ’twas not
Her husband’s presence only, called that spot
Of joy into the Duchess’ cheek”
Robert Browning

“such stuff
Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough
For calling up that spot of joy.”
Robert Browning

“Oh sir, she smiled, no doubt,
Whene’er I passed her; but who passed without
Much the same smile?”
Robert Browning

“Murmuring how she loved me”
Robert Browning

“To set its struggling passion free
From pride […]”
Robert Browning

“A sudden thought of one so pale
For love of her, and all in vain”
Robert Browning

“[…] at last I knew
Porphyria worshipped me […]”
Robert Browning

“And I, its love, am gained instead!”
Robert Browning

“Porphyria’s love: she guessed not how
Her darling one wish would be heard.”
Robert Browning

“And laid her soiled gloves by […]”
Robert Browning

“[…] untied
Her hat and let the damp hair fall,”
Robert Browning

“and made her smooth white shoulder bare”
Robert Browning

“…] she
Too weak, for all her heart’s endeavour,
To set its struggling passion free
From pride, […]”
Robert Browning

“[…] I found
A thing to do[…]”
Robert Browning

“[…] again
Laughed the blue eyes without a stain.”
Robert Browning

“It tore the elm-tops down for spite”
Robert Browning

“When glided in Porphyria: straight
She shut the cold out and the storm.”
Robert Browning

“Nor could tonight’s gay feast restrain”
Robert Browning

“And all night long we have not stirred,
And yet God has not said a word!”
Robert Browning

“I listened with heart fit to break.”
Robert Browning

“And kneeled and made the cheerless grate
Blaze up, and all the cottage warm;”
Robert Browning

“And last, she sat down by my side
And called me. When no voice replied,”
Robert Browning

“She put my arm about her waist,”
Robert Browning

“I propped her head up as before,
Only, this time my shoulder bore
Her head, which droops upon it still”
Robert Browning